RunAs Radio #6: Wes Miller on 64 bit #

Greg and I dive into a discussion on 64 bit technologies on the desktop and server in the 6th show of RunAs Radio with Wes Miller.

As always, you can send email to info@runasradio.com or comment here for feedback on shows you'd like to see, questions, criticisms, etc.

 

Wednesday, May 16, 2007 5:02:15 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) #    Comments [0]  | 

 

FlexWiki Released to SourceForge...#

I'm not a huge Wiki fan, but Microsoft putting software into the Open Source domain is pretty cool.

If you've never heard of Wikis, you're not alone, they're kind of a weird concept (and product), a web site that's fully editable by virtually anyone, so that you get this sort of disorganized amorphous blob of potentially useful information that keeps moving and changing... wow, its just like the Internet!

Anyway, Wikis were invented by Ward Cunningham, a terribly clever fellow who now works at Microsoft (which is, after all, the land of terribly clever people). FlexWiki was developed by David Ornstein, a Program Manager for Longhorn. Do these two facts have any relation? I dunno.

This is the third time Microsoft has posted software to SourceForge, the first, back in March of 2004 was the Windows Install XML (WiX) toolset. Second is the Windows Template Library, released in May. Both these projects are libraries, and so not of any interest to regular mortals, however, they are some of the most popular projects on SourceForge, with 103,000 and 22,000 downloads respectively - the page view counts are huge!

FlexWiki, as with WiX and WTL are released under the Common Public Licence and part of Microsoft's Shared Source Initiative.

FlexWiki represents the closest thing to a product released into the wilds of Open Source by Microsoft. It'll be interesting to see what comes next.

Tuesday, September 28, 2004 4:08:46 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) #    Comments [1]  | 

 

Allchin lays down on Longhorn#

Man, I'm a huge fan of Jim Allchin. He's straight talking, serious and kicks ass. My current favorite quote from Jim: “Malware. I want it dead.” And follows that by saying that he hadn't been able to deliver that 100% for XP SP2. But they're still plugging away.

But the topic of the day was Longhorn. Most people know that the name comes from the Longhorn bar that sits between Whistler (the code name of Windows XP) and Blackcomb (which was supposed to be the next version of Windows). But the reality of Longhorn is that it has grown to be an amazing and complex version of Windows. The highlight peices have been Avalon, Indigo and WinFS. Microsoft has promised a stunning amount of new functionality in Longhorn, and Jim is promising to deliver on it, just in a different form.

What's happened is that the Windows team is fixing the date of Longhorn - for “holiday time 2006.” To do that, they are breaking up the delivery of all these different features.

The exciting part is that versions of Avalon and Indigo are going to be made available for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. This is great news for developers, we're going to get a chance to build software utilizing the capabilities of these subsystems without having to have Longhorn. We don't have to drive our customers to the latest OS to take advantage of this new technology.

WinFS is being pushed back, to be delivered after Longhorn. The way Jim talked about it, it sounds to me like WinFS is growing in scope - the more they realize the power of object based data storage, the more development they need to do. Jim said they realized they don't want to ship the WinFS client component without the server component, and that means they need more time. It makes sense to me, it sounds like its going to be worth the wait. And it doesn't sound like its going to be long after, either. Jim says that WinFS will be in beta when Longhorn ships. That pretty much means that WinFS must ship in 2007 - Microsoft rarely ever goes over a year in beta.

The obvious question is “what's left for Longhorn?” and the answer is plenty. Sure, Avalon, Indigo and WinFS have been the highlight elements, but there is plenty more in the plan. A vastly more advanced search system is key, along with better functionality all around. The new display driver model of Longhorn is going to make a huge difference, I don't think we'll see the full power of Avalon until that is in place. A vastly improved deployment engine is going to make a big difference to anyone handling more computers than they can reach easily in one room.

In the end, the room applauded Jim, not just for being forthright about the realities, but because I think everyone here realized that this new plan is a better plan. Waiting for a massive shipment of all new code is not the best way to go - break the important bits down and get them out the door. That way we can kick the tires, explore the capabilities, and feed back into Microsoft to make them better. When the whole comes together, it'll be vastly superior to what we originally came up with at the beginning.

 

Friday, August 27, 2004 12:46:42 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00) #    Comments [1]  | 

 

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